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A home is one of the biggest investments a person will ever make and in order to keep that home glowing and increasing in value, a well-maintained property should be the goal for years to come. Of course, a warranty will provide protection, but seasonal maintenance by the homeowner is also key to long-lasting digs. As a professional in the industry, you’ve seen first-hand what irresponsibility will do to a residence. It’s imperative to remind your buyers that even though a home may be brand spanking new, regular maintenance is absolutely necessary to ensure safety, comfort, and retain resale value.

It’s easy to preach to a homebuyer about keeping up with seasonal tasks and send them on their merry way, but why not arm them with a comprehensive list of things they should be aware of? Steer them toward RWC's "season maintenance checklist" under the Homeowner's tab. This is a great tool for homeowners to stay on top of things. Furthermore, you as the builder must have gathered hundreds of maintenance tips during your career. Offer up those tips and hints as you meet with your clients throughout the home building journey.

Just for fun, here is a home maintenance quiz that will test your know-how. While this quiz does not address every conventional home maintenance project, it does provide helpful tips that may have been overlooked.

1. How often do forced-air furnace filters need to be changed?
At least every three months during the heating season.
2. What part of the faucet usually needs to be replaced when you have a water leak?
The washer.
3. Should you run hot or cold water through your garbage disposal?
Cold water.
4. How often should the moving parts of garage doors be oiled?
Every three months.
5. What tools can you use to unclog your drains?
A plunger and a plumber’s snake.
6. What tool can be used to unclog a toilet?
Coil spring-steel auger.
7. What faucet part needs to be cleaned every three to four months?
Aerator — the screen inside the end of the faucet.
8. What can you use for traction on icy sidewalks, steps, and driveways?
Cat litter or sand — never use salt because it damages the pavement.
9. Where should the fire in your fireplace be built?
On the irons or grate, never on the fireplace floor.
10. What will prevent soot and add color to the fire in your fireplace?
Throw in a handful of salt.
11. Where should your firewood be stored?
Outside, away from your house and not directly on the ground.
12. What helps keep unpainted concrete floors easy to keep clean?
Concrete Sealer.
13. What should you use to clean unpainted concrete floors?
A solution of 4 to 6 tablespoons of washing soda in a gallon of hot water. Mix scouring powder to the solution for tough jobs.
14. Why should frozen pipes be thawed slowly?
Frozen pipes should be thawed slowly to prevent the formation of steam, which could cause the pipe to burst.
15. How often should your roof be inspected?
A qualified roofer should inspect your roof every three years.
16. What should be regularly checked on your security system?
The alarms and circuit breakers should be checked to make sure they are in working order and the sensors should be inspected one by one.
17. At what temperature should your water heater be set?
120 degrees Fahrenheit
18. How often do skylights need to be inspected?
Skylights should be inspected each time your roof is inspected so leaks don’t develop from cracks and interruptions around its seals, caulking and flashings.
19. What can you use to help a window slide easily?
Rub the channel with a piece of paraffin.
20. What should you look for when you inspect your siding yearly?
Determine if wood-sided homes need to be repainted; check to see if the caulking around the windows and doors has split and cracked, and replace the caulk; clean the mildew; trim shrubbery away so it does not touch the siding.

(Quiz provided by NAHB.org)

Risk Retention Group (RRG) vs. Property & Casualty (P&C) Insurer

House in builder or realtor hands to keep safe and protected.This comparison has been an issue for many builders considering joining a new home warranty program or switching their current carrier. Residential Warranty Company, LLC (RWC) has backed its warranties with a Risk Retention Group (RRG) since 1990. It is our philosophy that warranties insured with a stable RRG will provide our builders and their homeowners with secure and reliable coverage for the entire warranty term.

This philosophy and game plan has been designed and refined based on experience in dealing with both sides of the issue. For years, RWC backed its warranties with P&C coverage. We discovered, first hand, the downside of this type of arrangement. P&C coverage can be extremely volatile both in terms of rates and continuity.

When using a P&C carrier, a warranty company’s rate structure is vulnerable to rate increases derived from losses in totally unrelated industries. For example, the country has seen more than its fair share of both natural disasters and environmental catastrophes. Consider the losses caused by Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Harvey, and Maria. If a P&C company suffers huge losses in even one of these events, the company’s rating may drop and it may be compelled to raise its insurance rates across all its lines of coverage. The end result is that a builder’s warranty rate goes up even though the warranty company’s loss ratio may be extremely low.

With an RRG, only one type of risk is insured - in this case, that means new home warranties and general liability insurance issued by RWC for our member builders exclusively. Consequently, our rates are based solely on our own loss ratio. If we continue to keep control of claims and continue to stringently screen members for quality, RWC will be able to maintain a sound and economically competitive rate structure. Oil tankers running aground and Category 4/5 Hurricanes will have no effect on the cost of a new home warranty or the strength of the insurance company!

RWC also discovered that P&C carriers are quick to drop blocks of business for a variety of reasons: too little premium generated, changes in corporate strategy, etc. If a P&C insurer chooses not to renew its master policy, the warranty company is left scrambling for a replacement. During RWC’s infancy, we found ourselves in this position all too frequently.

RRG’s are not fly-by-night organizations that are easily formed. Not only are they subject to insurance laws in their own domiciliary state, but they must also fulfill certain criteria before offering insurance in any other state. For example, each RRG must submit a copy of its plan of operation to the insurance commissioner of each state in which it intends to do business. It must also submit a copy of its annual financial statement to each state. Formation involves licensing, ownership and membership requirements. Failure to adhere to the strict mandates can subject groups to claims of unauthorized insurance activity.

We feel our members deserve an insurance structure that is committed to our program for the long haul. Additionally, we want backing that is financially strong enough so that our members can be certain it will be there in 5 years, 10 years and beyond. In terms of stability, security, economy and good old common sense, the move to an RRG was the most obvious and intelligent choice for RWC and our members.

Construction workerRWC has spent over 35 years building its reputation on superior customer service, competitive rates, effective dispute resolution and clearly defined warranty coverage. Being “builder oriented” is not a marketing gimmick for us but simply the way we do business every day. We concentrate on warranties and general liability for our members exclusively as our sole lines of business.

Consider the value of RRG-backed warranties and GL insurance. If you value stability of coverage and control over rates for long-term protection, you truly only have one good choice...an RWC home warranty and a GL insurance policy backed with one of the strongest insurance plans in the industry*.

*Western Pacific Mutual Insurance Company, a Risk Retention Group has been rated “A- (Excellent)” by A.M. Best since 2001. The RWC Insurance Advantage is insured by carriers rated at least “A- (Excellent)” by A.M. Best.

man and woman standing on sidewalk looking at house exteriorYou know homebuyers. They always have lots of questions. And not only just for you but they want to know about the products you used in their home. Below are many of the questions we get on a regular basis about the warranty you are providing with the homes you build. We just thought you should know in case any of these questions come up in your own conversations with your customers.  If you need more information, don’t hesitate to give us a call.

What is the value of an RWC warranty to my homebuyers?
- An RWC warranty provides insured, written coverage on various items for a specific period of time.
- Third party assistance to resolve customer service issues is available under all of our programs.
- Homeowners receive a clearly written warranty document spelling out exactly what is and is not covered.
- The resale value of your buyer’s home is increased when our warranty is transferred to the next owner.
- Homeowners have assurance that assistance is available if a covered item is defective.
- Builders wishing to use RWC or an Affiliate’s warranty must demonstrate technical competence, financial stability and ethical business dealings with their customers. Knowing that your builder is a member of one of our programs is assurance that these standards have been met or exceeded.
- The average cost to repair a structural failure exceeds $30,000. Having a warranty in place means that covered structural components will be repaired without causing you or your homeowner serious financial hardship.
- There is a greater likelihood of a major structural defect developing in a home than there is a fire which causes major damage. Homeowners probably have insurance to protect against fire damage. Why not be protected from structural failures as well?

What exactly is covered under my warranty?
RWC and Affiliates have over 75 different warranty options. So the answer to this question depends on which warranty was placed on the home. Coverage varies depending on the program selected by the Builder and the state in which the home is located. Refer to the warranty book received at closing for exact coverage and warranty terms.

How does a homeowner start the claims process?
The specific procedures to address a potential defect in a home are spelled out in the warranty book. The homeowner must send written documentation either by email to RWC at warranty.resolution@rwcwarranty.com or via certified mail, return receipt requested in order to initiate this process. We do not accept telephone or fax requests at this time.

What are mediation and arbitration?
RWC knows that, in the majority of cases, the root of many disputes is the lack of communication between a builder and a homeowner. Sometimes, all it takes to get an issue resolved is someone to take on the role of mediator and assist the others in coming to a fair and reasonable agreement, based on the warranty standards provided. Prior to heading to formal arbitration or costly litigation, RWC does its best to mediate disputes between Members and Homeowners.

Arbitration is a formal process conducted by an independent, neutral arbitrator to resolve disputes between two or more parties. In the case of our warranty programs, RWC uses arbitrators experienced in arbitrating residential construction matters. Unless prohibited by law, the decision of the arbitrator under our programs is binding on all parties, including the homeowner as well as the builder.

Your buyer has questions about the paperwork received regarding their home’s enrollment (duplicate book, incorrect information on Application for Warranty, etc). How do they contact RWC?
For questions regarding the Application for Warranty Form or any other Enrollment Paperwork issue, the homeowner may contact our main office at 717-561-4480 or click here and fill out our information request form.

RWC Builders Warranty Legal ArbitrationThe last couple decades have seen dramatic changes in the relationship between builders and their customers. A generation ago construction defect litigation rarely affected builders. In many jurisdictions, the old legal maxim caveat emptor, or “let the buyer beware”, applied to the sale of new homes. Twenty-first-century American society has turned that principle on its head. A more accurate watchword in these times is caveat builder or “let the builder beware” of litigious homeowners and plaintiffs' attorneys bent on making a lucrative monetary recovery in court for every perceived defect in every new home.

Residential construction litigation has increased in frequency and expense dramatically in the past two decades and exponentially in the past few years. Homeowners recover hundreds of millions of dollars from builders every year, and a typical settlement of a condominium association claim is not measured in thousands of dollars, but in millions of dollars.

A recent study revealed that more than half of all homeowner claims are about actual work performed in the building of the house and not about design, materials or maintenance. These complaints can create logistical headaches for builders and can lead to litigation that is expensive and tends to distract builders from their primary focus of building and selling homes. Express home warranties reduce the work, anxiety, and expense of these kinds of claims by spelling out the rights and remedies of the parties and by providing for arbitration, a quick and relatively inexpensive method for resolving disputes.

Arbitration provisions in express warranties provide that mutually agreed upon, neutral arbitrators hear the evidence from the parties and determine, without passion or prejudice for either side, who owes what to whom. Because most arbitration services have streamlined procedures, and because there are no juries for whom the lawyers must “dramatize” the case, arbitrations often result in less expense and reduced animosity between the parties.

In today's world, there is no reason why builders or homeowners should beware of dealing with each other after the settlement on a new home. If a builder provides his customer with an express warranty administered by a neutral third party, such as a new home builder warranty by RWC, both the builder and the homeowner can enjoy peace of mind because they have a clear and written description of how the home should perform and a quick, fair, and inexpensive process for resolving any disputes that might arise. All of RWC's warranty programs include out effective warranty resolution process which includes mediation and, if needed, formal arbitration.

If you need information on the procedures and/or rates to enroll ALL your building projects (remodeling, commercial, detached garages, condominiums, townhomes, etc.) with RWC to provide yourself with the most warranty protection available, contact your Account Executive at 800-247-1812, Ext 2149.

As the saying goes, you have to spend money to make money. Of course, everyone wants the promise of a great return-on-investment (ROI) on home renovations, but not all projects will yield a lofty payout. Decisions today can make or break a sale years down the road. So how does one choose which projects to tackle? Real estate guru Homeadvisor.com states these are the top five remodeling projects that will give homeowners the best bang for their buck:

FIBERGLASS INSULATION: 107.7% ROI: New insulation isn't exactly #1 on a home owner's to-do list, but those puffy sheets of energy efficiency will warm wallets with long-lasting savings. Insulation may not be pretty to look at, but it saves money and improves comfort.

ENTRY DOOR REPLACEMENT: 90.7% ROI: Secure and attractive! A quality steel door is a great choice for a home upgrade, plus it provides extra security and prevents unwanted drafts.

MANUFACTURED STONE VENEER: 89.4% ROI: Cheaper than natural options, engineered stone siding will give a home the revival it deserves while keeping the budget in mind. And as a bonus, today's fabricated products look just like the real thing! Natural stone also tends to put stress on the frame and foundation, so it's a win-win for this lighter alternative.

GARAGE DOOR REPLACEMENT: 85% ROI: Not only an aesthetic renovation, replacing the garage door also serves other purposes such as improved security and energy efficiency. A fresh design will surely give the home's exterior a boost in curb appeal.

MINOR KITCHEN REMODEL: 80.2% ROI: Small kitchen remodels ranging from $5,000 to $25,000 boasts a favorable return. Kitchens tend to be the hub of the home, so it only makes sense to make it work in your favor. Whether simple changes or reflowing the layout -- improving the design and usability of the space will pack a punch.

Builder or remodeler using a level in a kitchen upgradeWhile much of the country is experiencing a healthy resurgence in home building, what is also going strong is the market for additions and renovations. For many reasons, today’s homeowners are still very likely to consider remodeling their home. For those handymen and women that are up to the challenge, tackling home improvement projects on their own can be a very rewarding experience. On the other hand, for many average Americans, DIY isn’t an acronym on their resume. Whether it’s an expanding family that needs more space or a frightfully outdated avocado green kitchen that begs for a facelift, homeowners will be scouting out professionals to get the job done.

According to economists, the current demand for home-improvement is healthy. Per the latest Remodeling Index, remodeling activity nationwide has continued to grow and is projected to keep rising. Demographics tend to play a big role in future prosperity. As baby boomers retire, the likelihood of first floor bedrooms and bathrooms or wider doorways and hallways become a reality. On the other end of the spectrum, housing affordability may sway millennials’ decision to purchase older existing homes that will command renovations. And lest we forget Mother Nature. In the wake of the tragic flooding and hurricane-ravaged areas, countless homes have been compromised. It may be too early to tell what type of impact these storms will have on the marketplace, but rebuilding and renovating will not be a piece of cake.

How does your business fit into this niche? If you’ve been focusing solely on new home construction and haven’t given much thought to remodeling, perhaps now is the time to investigate. Could it be that you are in a position to aid in the recovery of storm-affected areas? Or simply think forward to January or February. For half of the country, the cold, winter months are right around the corner and new construction may wane. Several home improvement projects may be just the thing to fill in the gaps.

Ready to kick it up a notch? Why not check out the RWC Remodeler Warranty? Having a written warranty effectively reduces misunderstandings that can result from a verbal agreement and a handshake with clients. With RWC’s insurance backed protection, homeowners can be confident that you are a top-notch craftsman and that their remodeling project is a worthy investment.

Did you know that allergies are the sixth leading cause of chronic illness in the UniPhoto of young mother and children sitting with tabletted States? In fact, more than 50 million Americans suffer from allergies each year; and asthma affects more than 25 million. How do you, as a builder, tackle the respiratory issue from the ground up? Clean "healthy" homes are becoming mainstream and it is where homebuyers are turning in order to combat some of these problems.

The urge for wellness is compelling, however, building a healthy home can be a catch 22. While trying to prevent outdoor pollution and pollen from sneaking inside due to drafts and leaks, a home that is too airtight can actually be more tainted. Energy-efficient, well-sealed homes can trap chemicals and other irritants.

There are several factors to contemplate when trying to find that perfect balance of air quality. If healthy building standards are important to your buyers, consider these points when strategizing materials, schedules, and budgets.

• Conduct third-party certified air-quality tests to assess the particulates, then improve upon those numbers.

• Provide balanced ventilation to distribute and filter air properly. By keeping air changes to a minimum, drafty corners of homes will stay free of dust and will ensure fresh air is circulated throughout the home.

• Carbon monoxide is odorless and fatal, so it’s essential to install CO2 detectors on every floor.

• To decrease the problems from chemicals being emitted from new building materials, use as many natural products as possible. For example, select cabinets made of real wood or choose solid surface kitchen countertops such as slate, granite, or marble. This eliminates the adhesives associated with laminates.

• Taking the proper precautions to prevent mold growth is a no-brainer. Exterior insulation will warm the exterior sheathing so that the inside face of the sheathing does not become a condensing surface. Condensation in the walls means moisture which may lead to structural issues in the future. It’s also important to properly flash exterior penetrations, windows, and the roof to move water away from the home. Once water finds its way in, the home is no longer truly healthy.

• And last but not least, take pride in your work and keep a clean worksite. Clients want transparency, so by snapping a few photos of wall cavities that are free of sawdust and dirt reinforces your integrity and commitment to a healthy home.

RWC marketing materials Warranty signsOne of the many advantages of your membership in the RWC Warranty Program is the marketing support available for your use. You can enhance your sales strategy for today’s competitive marketplace by taking full advantage of RWC’s marketing essentials. Best of all, they are FREE!

Below are a few examples of what is available, but feel free to browse our marketing materials page to see what best suits your needs. Consumer brochures are also available to pass onto your homeowners so they can better understand the warranty on their home.

- Electrical Box Sticker (form # 204): This self-adhesive sticker makes it easy for your homeowners to find their warranty validation number. Affix this sticker to their electrical box during your final walk-through inspection.

- Small vertical Easel (form # 509): Sometimes space is limited on countertops. When that’s the case and our full-size easel or brochure holder doesn’t fit, try this smaller version. Works great in sales offices and model homes!

- Static Cling Window Decals (form #533): This cling is perfect for windows in model homes, sales offices or even homes under construction. This static cling decal will let your prospective buyers know that their home will be protected with an RWC warranty.

HOW TO ORDER SUPPLIES:
Order Online through Warranty Express (top right corner of webpage). Call us if you still need a password to login.

Email: info@rwcwarranty.com and let us know which items you are interested in.

Phone: 800-247-1812, Ext 2459

We ask that you please order only a 2-3 month supply to ensure that you receive the most current materials.

orange safety coneIf you’ve been a builder for more than a few years you’ve been through a lot. When the housing bubble burst; you survived. Now that the market is better and your business is growing, you’re starting to realize the rewards of surviving. There are still plenty of challenges and one of them is to find qualified subcontractors.

Recently, you started a new subdivision and hired a flat concrete contractor you’ve never worked with before, to put in the sidewalks. This morning you got a call from your new sub; the kind you never want to get. A woman was walking her dog next to your project around dusk last night. She tripped over a mason’s line that was left across a section of sidewalk that had been poured earlier that day. The new flat work guy left the site without setting up any cones, fencing or signs. In fact, he did nothing to warn the public of what is commonly referred to as a “trip & fall hazard.” The woman suffered fractures to both wrists as well as lacerations to her face when she fell. Her injuries will require surgery and she’ll be unable to work for several months. Her pain and suffering have yet to be determined.

Your new sub has his own general liability insurance that should respond to this claim. You required him to have his insurance company add you to his policy as additional insured. That way they will defend you if and when the woman’s attorney sues you as well as your sub. The certificate of insurance you required your sub to provide shows all of this. Everything should be fine. But, trip & fall claims can spiral out of control.

Disputes can arise over who should have protected the worksite. Subcontractors or, their attorneys, can argue that’s the general contractor’s job. You feel that you don’t have time to hover over every job site making sure each sub is placing the proper emphasis on safety. Besides, you hired them to do a job and that includes doing it safely. Doesn’t it? All your subs understand this, don’t they?

In most states, you as the general contractor, are ultimately responsible for worksite safety. That doesn’t mean the subs get a free pass. But it usually means the general contractor has to do more than just assume everyone is being safe. That means holding periodic safety meetings, making sure new subs understand what you expect from them before starting work each morning, during the workday and after shutting down for the night. Active worksites are dangerous places even when they are nothing more than a partially completed sidewalk in poor light where an unsuspecting woman takes her dog for a walk.

Holding regular safety meetings doesn’t have to take a lot of time or cost you much money. Meetings don’t have to be held every day; just regularly enough to make it clear to everyone concerned that you are committed to preventing accidents involving both the public and anyone else at your worksites.

The RWC Insurance Advantage is dedicated to loss prevention. To prove it, we offer up to 25% off your new general liability premium if you provide us with a copy of your written safety program. If you’re already insured with us, we’ll even offer the same incentive on your next renewal if you haven’t already received it.

Call us today at 866-454-2155 to find out if you qualify and receive a free, no obligation quote.

Today’s home buyers are tech-savvy shoppers who routinely turn to the internet when searching for new homes. As a successful builder, you understand the vital importance of maintaining a solid presence on the internet so potential buyers can find you, learn about what you offer, and discover what makes you better than “the other guys”.

A young couple looking at a laptop researching new home warranties and construction builders.RWC has an entire section of our website dedicated to educating the homebuyer on everything from how to choose a home builder to understanding what a new home warranty is all about. The following resources can help explain the value of your decision to provide an RWC warranty on your home:

Something ‘extra’ you provide which sets you apart from the competition is the fact you offer a 3rd party insured warranty – and not just any warranty – but the RWC warranty. The sales process is complex with a variety of topics to discuss with potential home buyers. Our goal is to make the warranty explanation easier for you by expanding our online resources for your homebuyers. Hopefully, this section will become your “go to” resource for warranty information for your staff and your buyers.

Obviously, it makes perfect sense to provide your buyers with information about your warranty. Simply link your site to the RWC Homeowner section to point them in the right direction and we’ll tell the story for you! We suggest linking to www.rwcwarranty.com/homeowners as your starting point. Your buyers will learn about the extra mile you travel to demonstrate your professionalism and customer service by providing them with this written RWC warranty.